This is an exposition of Luke 20:27-41. This message by Pastor Rod Harris was delivered at Trinity Baptist Church on Sunday morning, October 29, 2017.

Intro:

They were relentless in their pursuit. For months they planned and schemed. Now they had him in their midst. They could not let him escape. It is now or never. There was only one problem – they needed a reason to get rid of him! They couldn’t very well go to the authorities and say, “We don’t like him – kill him for us.”

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 For months they have dogged his trail seeking to find something – anything. They were left with nothing. They could build a case for blasphemy but that would not interest the Romans. They would most likely laugh at such a charge and send them packing. No, they would have to claim some threat to Rome. If they could just cause a disturbance in the city and pin it on him. If they could just get him to say something that could, in any way, be taken as anti-Rome. Nothing. But they were persistent. They were united. And it was an interesting coalition. Hate has an incredible ability to unite. Hatred brought together the Pharisees, the Sadducees and the Herodians a most unlikely trio. Each group took their best shot. Each failed.

We are in the final days of the earthly life and ministry of the Lord Jesus. Throughout his ministry he has been careful about what he has revealed and when he revealed it. It was obvious, from the beginning, that he was moving according to a predetermined schedule. He moved at his own pace and acted according to his own agenda. Now the time had come to make himself known. Now was the time for the unveiling. There had been glimpses here and there – now the time had come for the full unveiling. Thus he entered Jerusalem in dramatic fashion just days before – openly declaring himself to be the Messiah. He cleansed the Temple and assumed his role as Lord of the Temple. This hardly seems appropriate for a man with a price on his head! Some might goes as far as saying it is foolish. No, it is not foolish; the time for redemption has come. The kingdom of God is now arriving. Our text this morning is found in Luke chapter 20 beginning with verse 27.

Text: Luke 20:27-47

Herbert Lockyer calls it the week that changed the world and that it is. On Sunday the miracle-working rabbi from Galilee rode into town on a donkey declaring himself king. Claiming that he is in fact the long awaited Messiah of the Jews. He entered to shouts of “Hosanna” – “Save Us.” The next morning he caused a major disturbance in the Temple. For the next couple of days he moved about the Temple teaching. His teaching amazed the multitudes and enraged the establishment. By Thursday evening he was gathered with his disciples and at the Passover meal instituted a new memorial meal that would mark the beginning of a new age. Thursday night, late, he was arrested on fabricated charges. Through a series of illegal hearings and trials he was condemned and by Friday morning an angry mob was crying, “Crucify him! Crucify Him!” He was taken just outside the city wall and nailed to a cross where he bled and died. The shout of “Hosanna, blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord” had barely died down before his lifeless body was placed in a borrowed grave. A lot had happened in six days but it wasn’t over yet. Early Sunday morning – just 1 week after his entrance into the city – his followers arrived at an open grave. They were the first to learn – He has risen! No, it was no ordinary week.

Thesis: Our Lord’s encounter with the Sadducees underscores the certainty and significance of the resurrection.

There are three things I want us to note in the passage that is before us.

  1. The Question Raised. (20:27-33)
  2. A Thorough and Authoritative Answer. (20:34-38)
    The theological response (34-36)
    The exegetical response – 37-38
  3. Silence! (20:39-40)

Conclusion:
Yes, there is an after life. Yes, the dead will be raised. This has been the plan of God all along. Sown corruptible and raised incorruptible. Sown in weakness raised in glory. Raised to be like the angels - immortal, obedient, constantly engage in the worship of God; sons of God (both male and female sons in that both share in the inheritance); sons of the resurrection.